Adding Spice with Chile Infused Sea Salts
15
Jun 2019

Visit any grocery store or food market and you’ll find a wide assortment of colorful chile peppers in various shapes and sizes.  Despite, the name, not all peppers are hot and spicy.  The pungency of chile peppers is measured using the Scoville scale.  The amount of capsaicin in each chile is measured and assigned a Scoville Heat Unit (SHU) between 0 and  3 million.  Milder peppers, such as bell peppers, are between 0 to 100 SHUs while the more fiery varietals, like Carolina Reaper, currently the hottest in the world comes in at 1.4 to 2.2. million SHU.  A range is generally offered because even peppers within the same varietal can be spicier due to the number of seeds and individual growing conditions.

Chile infused sea salts offer a great way to add subtle or bold heat to your dishes.  For a start, try them as a substitute to your favorite hot sauce on buffalo wings, eggs, fajitas, pasta, chili, salsa, nuts, and cheeses.  With continued use, you’ll soon find new and exciting ways to incorporate them into your dishes.  Inspiced offers five varietals of Chile infused sea salts with varying heat levels.  We’ve included information about each to help you choose the one most suited for your tastes:

  • Sriracha Sea Salt is made from the Thai chile pepper sauce which contains about 1,000-2,500 SHU.
  • Chile Lime Salt is a combination of lime infused sea salt, red chile, cayenne and crushed red peppers containing 30,000-50,000 SHU. 
  • Habanero Heat is made with the Habanero Peppers and contains 100,000-350,000 SHU.
  • Give Up the Ghost is made from Ghost Peppers and contains 855,000-1,041,000 SHU.
  • Trini Stinger is made with Trinidad Scorpion Peppers and contains 1,200,000-2,000,000 SHU.  

Our assortment offers something for every spice lover.  For the truly adventurous, we offer a Heat Seekers Collection which contains all five of our chile infused sea salts.  What happens if you go a tad too spicy?   The best remedy for a too-spicy bite is to follow it with a thick dairy product, such as sour cream or Greek yogurt, which neutralizes the capsaicin oil.



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